Lichfield Garrick Theatre

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History

The Lichfield Garrick is at the heart of the cultural regeneration of the District of Lichfield. It was conceived, and is owned and run by Lichfield District Council.

Lichfield GarrickAppropriately named after one of Lichfield's most famous sons, actor/manager David Garrick, the Lichfield Garrick is a re-model of the 1970's Civic Hall.

During its 25-year history the Civic Hall became the home of a burgeoning local arts scene and successfully provided Lichfield City Centre with a middle-scale venue to present professional entertainments.

However by the late 1990s the venue had lost pace with the needs of contemporary artists and audiences and it became increasingly clear as the 20th century drew to a close that Lichfield needed a new venue for a new millennium.

And so the Civic Hall closed its doors for the last time on June 4th 2001 and in January 2002 the construction of the Lichfield Garrick began.

Designed by architects Short and Associates the Lichfield Garrick incorporates two performance spaces and four levels of gallery space for the visual arts.

The Main Auditorium's Fly Tower and Orchestra Pit were essential additions for the successful production of musicals by local amateur companies, and provided the venue with facilities to attract opera, ballet and touring productions to the city.

The "black box" Studio theatre brought a new kind of theatre space to the city, giving a venue for more intimate and experimental work.

After a nail-biting 18-month build the Lichfield Garrick opened its doors on time on July 1st 2003 and, with a flurry of critical acclaim, a new era for the arts in Lichfield began.

"The town that made Johnson famous now has a twenty-first century reason to be pleased with itself; a bright new theatre."
The Observer, September 2003